HOT CROSS BUNS - Facts?

A hot cross bun is a spiced sweet bun made with currants or raisins and marked with a cross on the top.

Hot cross buns are traditionally eaten warm on Good Friday for breakfast. They were once sold by street vendors who sang a little song about them. "Hot cross buns, Hot cross buns,One a penny, two a penny,
Hot cross buns."

The pastry cross on top of the hot cross buns symbolises and reminds Christians of the cross that Jesus was killed on.

Hot Cross Bun ceremony, at the London Pub, The Widow's Son, a Hot Cross Bun Ceremony takes place each Good Friday. In the early 19th century, a widow who lived on the site was expecting her sailor son back home for Easter, and placed a hot cross bun ready for him on Good Friday. The son never returned, but undaunted the widow left the bun waiting for him and added a new bun each year. Successive landlords have kept the tradition going after the pub was opened.

Superstitions surrounding Hot Cross Buns - one of them says that buns baked and served on Good Friday will not spoil or mold during the subsequent year. Another encourages keeping such a bun for medicinal purposes. A piece of it given to someone who is ill is said to help them recover.Sharing a hot cross bun with another is supposed to ensure friendship throughout the coming year, particularly if "Half for you and half for me, Between us two shall goodwill be" is said at the time, so some say they should only be cooked one at a time. If taken on a sea voyage, hot cross buns are said to protect against shipwreck. If hung in the kitchen, they are said to protect against fires and ensure that all breads turn out perfectly. The hanging bun is replaced each year.